Restoration Projects

image

Why Restore?

It's all about resolution and contrast.

 

The image above is the a copy of the latest version of a remastering of the original work.   I have been working on the remastering of The Land of Make Believe Map for over four years.  My goal is to redraw the the image as an overlay of the original.


  1.   What would be the purpose and scope of the remastering.
  2.  Technical variables required definition and finalization?
  3.  A overall image subject matter plan was constructed?
  4.  Add some time for aesthetic  changes during remastering.
  5.  I have been working pixel by pixel.


This version of the map will not be available for sale for at least another year.   Yes there is a new version of “The Land of Make Believe Map” in the works.

 

Prior to the digital imaging age, reproducing images involved either photographing the work of art and creating the printing plates from the re-pro image, or shooting the work of art directly to the press film.

 

A less desirable method of reproducing a printable version of the an image was to copy the lithographic press film directly creating a new set of press films. This some time called a direct print.

 

In the imaging world there are a few truths, one of those truths is that the more an image is reproduced the greater the chance will be for the image to increase in contrast.

A real world example is the use of Copy Machines.  Let's say you have a photo and you need to make 100 copies of the image.  You lay the image on the copiers glass platen and press the copy button 100 times.  You will have 100 pretty decent copies.  We are going to speed up the increase in contrast in the image.  Lay the image on the copiers glass, make one copy.  Replace the image you just copied with the one on the glass platen, do this ten times.  With each new generation the image will morph into chaos.  The contrast will increase which will cause the image to loose detail.   In order to minimize damage to reproduced images the key is to never print any further then one generation from the original.

Prior to the digital age, reproducing images involved either photographing the work of art and creating the printing plates from the re-pro image, or shooting the work of art directly to the press film.

A less desirable method of reproducing a printable version of the an image was to copy the lithographic press film directly creating a new set of press films. This some time called a direct print.

 

 Over the last almost one hundred years Hess’s work was reproduced in varying levels of quality. Over time, the work built up contrast which reduced the resolution of the details in the work. in fact the set of films I received from “Hagstrom Map Company” back in 1999, the film was very high in contrast as well as out of registration. The damage required me to spend hundreds of hours repairing areas of the image pixel by pixel.


Three years ago I began to contemplate redrawing the map utilizing the original image as a direct guide. My goals where numerous, yet my main goal was to repair the damage that the image had suffered over it’s life- time. To date I have logged close to a thousand hours repainting “The Land of Make Believe Map”.


I am in a conundrum, I want people to purchase the older version of the map, yet, I also felt a need to repair the image as a whole and offer the re- paired version for purchase. Later in 2017 I will present the new version of “The Land of Make Believe Map”. So keep an eye out for the new version.

*The detail issues I am alluding to are only perceptible as extremely close viewing.

Copyright Information

Copyright 2017 Allan Rosen-Ducat © All rights reserved

Artist Jaro Hess

Jaro Hess (1889-1977)
Jaro Hess was perhaps the most original artist of fantasy working in Grand Rapids from the 1930s through the 1960’s. His art was a rarity, created solely out of this imagination.

Hess savored the differences

They were the product of an idiosyncratic and eccentricity, “according to Hess. People come to see the painting, “the artist said, “and they ask how I got such an imagination to do them. I just tell them that I studied mathematics in school and it teaches you to think abstract thoughts. They are different,” Hess savored the differences – the absurdity.